Business roundup: NCWorks Career Center to host Second Chance job fair July 23 – Salisbury Post – Salisbury Post

SALISBURY — The NCWorks Career Center Rowan is looking for employers that hire former offenders to participate in the Second Chance Job Fair on July 23, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

The NCWorks Career Center will help applicants create a resume if needed at the center, 1904 S. Main Street. You can also call 704-639-7529.

BenchMark Physical Therapy opens outpatient clinic in Salisbury

SALISBURY—BenchMark Physical Therapy opened an outpatient clinic at 850 Jake Alexander Blvd. West.

The clinic is open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday and 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. BenchMark offers in-clinic and telehealth options for outpatient orthopedic physical therapy, including manual therapy, injury prevention, return to performance, total joint replacement, concussion management and vestibular rehabilitation programs.

Clinic director Hannah Kiziah earned a bachelor’s degree in recreational science from Western Carolina University and a doctor of physical therapy degree from Lynchburg College. She is certified as an orthopedic clinical specialist and in trigger point dry needling. She has completed advanced training in chronic pain treatment.

To make an appointment, call 704-209-4711 or visit benchmarkpt.com.

Rowan EDC unveils new ‘AgBioscience’ brochure, new name

Rowan County is preparing to grow the “AgBiosciences” field with a new recruitment effort.

Since Rowan County has access to farmland, bigger cities and higher-education institutions, it is able to expand into the field of AgBioscience, the Rowan County Economic Development Council said in its weekly newsletter. With a focus on converging food, agriculture and science industries, the Rowan EDC has created an AgBioscience brochure to target industries that hope to do just that.

“There are countless resources in the area that make Rowan County an excellent candidate for companies in the food processing, agriculture and bioscience industries,” said Rod Crider, Rowan EDC president. “We have the NC Food Innovation Lab right next door in Kannapolis, access to the NC BioTech Center, and a great water resource with the Yadkin River. We’re hoping to take advantage of these resources and find and create new partnerships that will be beneficial to companies across not just Rowan County, but the entire Charlotte metro and Piedmont Triad areas.”

To aid in the recruitment efforts, Rowan EDC is partnering with Applied Marketing to engage in a targeted recruitment campaign, set to get underway shortly. The EDC collaborated with Miller Davis on the creation of the AgBioscience brochure.

The Rowan EDC is also noting it has changed the commission in its name to council. The now-Rowan Economic Development Council is meant to better represent the organization’s public-private partnership. The private sector will become more closely involved through up to five additions to the Rowan EDC board of directors. Previously, the board consisted of 10 total spots: seven appointed by the Rowan County Board of Commissioners, two by the Salisbury City Council and one by the other towns in the county. The board originally ratified the proposals in February, which have since been approved by each of the Rowan County municipalities and went into effect in June.

“We’ve seen over the last year and a half how important it is to have the support of both our local governments and private-sector organizations,” said Crider. ” ‘Council’ is a term which reflects that partnership between public and private, while ‘commission’ is generally a public-sector term.”

Additionally, the Board approved a change to the fiscal year, joining it with the calendar year. The upcoming half-fiscal year will go from July 1 to Dec. 31 before the next full-year fiscal term begins on Jan. 1.

Kannapolis Police Department welcomes new police officers

KANNAPOLIS — Four new officers have joined the Kannapolis Police Department.

The officers have completed their basic law enforcement training and are now starting their field training. The new officers are Crim Christopher, Nathan Feinstein, Tyler Lewis and Cody Meadows. As part of their field training, each officer is assigned to two experienced Kannapolis Police Officers in the patrol division for the next five months.

Christopher is a native of Pennsylvania and graduated from Walsh University in Ohio with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and applied criminal justice. He graduated from the basic law enforcement training program at Mitchell Community College. He is the son of Mark and Stacie Crim of Reading, Pennsylvania.

Feinstein is a native of Raleigh and he graduated from Louisburg College with an associate degree. He completed his basic law enforcement training at Wake Technical Community College. He is the son of Adee Feinstein and Patty Buryi of Cary.

Lewis is a native of Wisconsin and he served in the U.S. Army from 2016 to 2020. He also graduated from the basic law enforcement training program at Mitchell Community College. He is the son of Sharon Lewis of Indiana.

Meadows graduated from East Rowan High School and attended Catawba College. He completed his basic law enforcement training at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College. He is the son of Terri Hosch and the late Phillip Hosch of Mooresville.

Three Rivers Land Trust recognizes four new board members

SALISBURY — Three Rivers Land Trust announced the addition of four new board members to its board of directors on June 11.

The new members are Karen Auman from Randolph County, John Bartlett from Harnett County, West Hunter from Iredell County and Frances Willis of Scotland County.

Auman is a native of North Carolina and has lived all across the state from the Outer Banks to the mountains where she served in regional, county and state positions with concentrations in tourism and emergency operations. Karen has both her undergraduate and graduate degrees from UNC-Greensboro. Before her retirement, Auman worked in public service for 38 years.

Bartlett is a professor in wildlife ecology at Campbell University. Bartlett received his bachelor’s degree from Virginia Tech, his master’s degree from the University of Tennessee and his doctorate from the University of Maine. As an ornithologist, his research has touched on land cover changes and how it relates to bird species abundance. Bartlett initiated the first Three Rivers Land Trust college chapter this year.

Hunter is returning to the board of directors. Hunter graduated from North Carolina State University with an undergraduate degree in political science and government. Hunter is the owner of Hunter Construction Group as well as Hunting Creek Farms, a wedding event venue.

Willis is the final member joining the board of directors. Willis has spent the past 57  years helping make decisions about family land management. Willis runs three businesses in downtown Laurinburg with the help of her husband.

In addition to bringing on new board members, two outgoing board members were recognized at the June 11th board of directors meeting. John Broadwell of Cumberland County and Vince Zucchino of Moore County both joined the board of directors in June of 2019 when Three Rivers Land Trust merged with Sandhills Area Land Trust.

Lutheran Services Carolinas secures $186 million for future projects

WILMINGTON — Truist Securities secured the $186.8 million tax-exempt bonds for Lutheran Services Carolinas. The financing includes a combination of $145.6 million fixed-rate bonds and $41.3 million in bank financing provided by Truist Bank.

The bond offering resulted in orders totaling $1.5 billion with the all-in total interest cost of 3.37%.

Salisbury-based Lutheran Services Carolinas plans to use the money for construction of Trinity Landing, a 184-unit senior living community that will will be constructed on the Intracoastal Waterway in Wilmington. Completion is scheduled for 2022.

Trinity Landing will join Trinity Grove to form the region’s only continuing care retirement community on the water.

Lutheran Services Carolinas also refinanced all of their existing debt, including the recent expansions in Albemarle and Clemmons and existing bonds.

County’s supply of homes isn’t keeping up with demand

SALISBURY — Rowan County continues to see an increase in home demand with a supply that isn’t keeping up.

An analysis provided by the Rowan County Chamber of Commerce shows new listings have increased significantly from May 2020, but pending sales still outpace supply. Record-low rates, lack of materials, lack of skilled and unskilled labor and urban flight have contributed to the real estate issues in Rowan County.

In May 2020, Rowan County saw a 2.3-month supply of inventory. In May 2021, the county saw a 0.7-month supply. Lack of supply, influx of people and intra-state movement from urban hubs to more rural locations have caused a dramatic increase in median and average sales price.

The median sales price increased by 26.2% during that period. The average price rose 34%. In 2011, the average home price in Rowan County was $110,999. Five years later, the average home price grew steadily to $147,515. Currently, the year-to-date average home price is $232,702.

New Dollar General opens on US 52

SALISBURY — Dollar General has opened the doors on a new store at 6285 U.S. 52.

Dollar General stores carry most household essentials, including food, cleaning supplies, paper products, over-the-counter medicines, hygiene products and baby items. The new store will include the company’s new home décor and an expanded party preparation selection.

“At Dollar General, we believe the addition of each new store provides positive economic growth for the communities we proudly serve, and the addition of our new Salisbury store highlights our commitment to deliver a pleasant shopping experience that includes great prices on quality products in a convenient location, ” said Dan Nieser, Dollar General’s senior vice president of real estate and store development. “We look forward to welcoming customers to our new store and hope they will enjoy shopping at our new location.”

To commemorate the opening of Dollar General’s new Salisbury location, Dollar General plans to donate 100 new books to a nearby elementary school to benefit students ranging from kindergarten to fifth grade. Through the partnership with the Kellogg Company, the donation will be part of a planned donation of more than 100,000 books across the country to celebrate new DG store openings.

The store is expected to hire six to 10 people.

North Carolina Railroad Company announces new general counsel

RALEIGH— The North Carolina Railroad Company is welcoming Robert Dobronski as its general counsel.

Dobronski brings more than 15 years of experience leading and advising short-line railroads. Dobronski joins North Carolina Railroad Company on Tuesday.

“Robert really understands the railroad industry,” says NCRR President and CEO, Carl Warren, “I’m impressed with Robert’s leadership and practical approach to railroading, as well as his knowledge of sales and marketing, real estate and federal railroad regulations. He is bringing a breadth and depth of knowledge at an important time.”

“I am truly excited by the opportunity to join NCRR and look forward to working with the entire team,” says Dobronski. “I see NCRR being in a unique position and on the verge of remarkable change and substantial growth that will have a wide-reaching beneficial impact on North Carolina.”

Dobronski most recently served as vice president and general counsel of the Adrian and Blissfield Railroad Company in Westland, Michigan. He also has served as an adjunct lecturer and professor at Eastern Michigan University and Michigan State University. Dobronski graduated from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom with a master’s degree in business admistration.

North Carolina to add more than 300,000 new jobs over the next decade

RALEIGH— North Carolina plans to create more than 300,000 jobs by 2028, with most of the new jobs being in the service industry.

According to the North Carolina Department of Commerce’s new employment projections, most industry sectors operating in the state are projected to grow. Jobs in health care and professional, scientific and technical fields are expected to grow the most.

“We have strong momentum creating thousands of good new jobs in North Carolina because of our world-class workforce and high quality of life,” said Gov. Roy Cooper. “By projecting our expected growth, we can better recruit new industries and continue to educate and train our people to succeed as our state thrives.”

The Commerce Department and its Labor & Economic Analysis Division publish industry and occupational employment projections every two years, offering insights to support planning and decision making by job seekers, educators, business leaders, workforce development professionals and policymakers.

Based on the projections through 2028, occupations that require a master’s, doctorate or professional degree are projected to have the fastest annual growth, slightly higher than those requiring a bachelor’s degree. Three occupation groups are projected to grow the fastest — computer and mathematical, healthcare support, personal care and service.

More information on the 2018-2028 employment projections can be found on the Department of Commerce’s website at nccommerce.com/data-tools-reports/labor-market-data-tools/employment-projections.